Review: Thunder Road

Rich, dark humour lifts tragic cop story

 By Samuel Barson

To fund the making of a film with a Kickstarter campaign is no mean feat. But when that film proves to be one of the highlights of 2018 cinema, amongst a myriad of Marvel blockbusters and the like, that is one superior feat.

Jim Cummings has been loitering the world of film all of his life. He has played a number of roles in the industry: cinematographer, on set photographer, light production assistant (on a Marvel film, coincidentally) and sound editor. He has worn numerous hats and it feels as though these eclectic experiences have all built up to Thunder Road, which Cummings has directed, written and starred in.

The film begins at police officer Jim Arnaud’s (played by Cummings) mother’s funeral.  He gives a eulogy that is painful to watch due to its awkwardness (it ends with an experimental dance to a Bruce Springsteen song) and heavy grief. After his mother passes, Jim is confronted with an extensive list of difficult events in his life: a divorce, the estrangement of his daughter, the loss of his job and another death.

This is a lot of trauma to put a character through, but Cummings’ incredible nuance and strong sense of realism as an actor leaves the audience believing every emotion and every heartbreak. His use of facial expressions to express the grief, shock and anger his character goes through is astounding. He also has an incredibly strong comedic grounding with a lot of the traumatic events in the film being lifted with a rich, dark humour.

The direction is simple, yet stunning and intimate for the audience to bear witness to. In particular, the repetitive use of a long shot that slowly transforms into a mid or close up makes audiences feel like they’re in the room with the characters, especially in moments of intimate dialogue or deep insight into a character’s current state. The writing almost appears effortless, but may also be a testament to the impressive ensemble cast Cummings has collected (most of whom appear to have very limited prior acting experience).

It’s incredible what Cummings and his team achieved here. Using a $200,000 budget, they have created a film which has, in box office sales, made more than its cost. Thunder Road deserves to be seen, so much more than many other films released last year.

A must-see for fans of simple storytelling, and for those who appreciate dark humour as much as they do a deeply touching, character-driven narrative.

Thunder Road screens in Nova Cinema, Carlton until 24 April as well as in select cinemas across Australia. Tickets can be purchased online

Photograph: supplied

Advertisements