Review: Girl

Masterful, heartwarming coming-of-age tale 

By Ross Larkin

One can generally always be assured that the Alliance Française French Film Festival will deliver an array of thought-provoking, innovative and entertaining flicks from a nation who arguably does art house better than any other.

If Lukas Dhont’s Girl is an indication of the calibre of this year’s selection, then 2019 will certainly live up to expectation.

Girl is a coming-of-age tale about a female teenager, Lara, trapped inside the body of a male and the struggles she faces while awaiting gender reassignment surgery.

Lara, played with incredible poignancy and sensitivity by newcomer Victor Polster, is training relentlessly as a ballerina at a top dance academy in an environment where her peers and teachers are all aware of her transitioning.

As is her single father, in a wonderfully touching portrayal by Arieh Worthalter, whose support is determined, passionate and full of love.

Save for the occasional upsetting moments of external bigotry, most of the demons Lara face are within herself, as she battles with a body she despises and feels all but foreign to.

Director Dhont manages to hit just the right chord with the tone and pace of the film, without labouring too indulgently on the darker aspects, and the performances he coaxes from his actors are exquisitely subtle, natural and endearing.

The subject matter is explored delicately, yet realistically, and while aspects of the story are at times harrowing, there is an equal measure of tenderness and joy as well as some beautiful symbols and metaphors the French are so renowned for.

One of very few films to include a transgendered protagonist, it is heartwarming to see such a masterful exploration by way of Girl, and I urge all film lovers to partake in the experience.

Girl screens 5 March – 10 April at selected Palace Cinemas across Australia as part of the 30th Alliance Française French Film Festival. Tickets can be purchased online.

 

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