Review: Evita

Tina Arena’s lead receives a standing ovation

By Samuel Barson 

There is something undeniably refreshing about the story of Eva Perón. First and foremost, she was very much a woman in the centre of her own story. And while her husband was the President of Argentina, she too had a great deal of power as a celebrated actress and tireless advocate of workers’ rights and women’s suffrage. The truthfulness of her humble beginnings and subsequent life story also provide audiences with a break from the clichéd romanticism of many biopic stage adaptations. In this Australian tour of Evita, director Harold Prince has curated a strong cast and has created the most powerful, raw and heartfelt of musical productions.

I am usually quite cynical of big names being cast in big Australian productions. In an age of repeated casting, it’s become quite easy for certain showbiz personalities to be cast simply because of who they are. Tina Arena is a significant exception. Her grace, beauty and talent shine tenfold in her portrayal of the titular character. Her voice is reliably flawless, and she pleasantly surprises with her acting skill. Despite the numerous scenes and range of notes she perfects, the most memorable moment of the night was the curtain call. The tears Tina shed as she looked out into the large sea of a standing ovation perfectly reflected a humility and grace rarely seen on stage.

Supporting her were two equally impressive men. Tony Award winner Paulo Szot did the required work as Eva’s stoic husband, Juan Perón, to allow Arena’s Eva to take charge. Kurt Kansley was particularly impressive as Che, guiding the audience along with utmost energy, humour and aggressive charm in his role as narrator.

Rounding out the support cast were the charismatic and flashy Michael Falzon as Magaldi and recent high-school leaver Alexis van Maanen in a wonderful yet brief turn as the Mistress.

The ensemble cast were tight and provided the leads with an intricate and brilliant support network. Larry Fuller’s choreography put the cast to good use as they filled the stage and evoked the emotions of the Argentinian people.

Timothy O’Brien and Richard Winkler’s respective set and lighting design managed to be epic yet not too overdone. In collaboration with Duncan McLean’s clever video and projection design, they transported audiences into the essence of 1940’s Argentina and left room for our imaginations to fill the gaps. Mick Potter’s sound design complimented David Cullen’s exquisite orchestration, and Guy Simpson did a beautiful job in conducting their work.

Evita is a delightful production, with arguably the strongest leading musical cast to be seen in Melbourne. Tina Arena proves herself to be one of Australia’s most dynamic and versatile performers, and she is supported by a cast that I hope to see more often on Australia’s mainstages. Tickets to this production could be the perfect Christmas present for those who enjoy an entertaining night out.

Evita is being performed at Arts Centre Melbourne’s State Theatre until 17 February 2019. Tickets can be purchased online and by calling the box office on 1300 182 183.  

Photograph: Jeff Busby

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