Review: Bottomless

Engrossing and heartbreaking depiction of addiction and sobriety

By Owen James

Beneath an unsettling thunderstorm brewing overhead, the lives of seven people teeter on an alcoholic precipice of temptation both inside and outside the gates of the Broome Sober Up Centre. Will the ambitious Will find a way to become their angelic saviour of sobriety before the heavens above open up to quench the land’s thirst?

The personal connection for writer Dan Lee resonates deep inside every word of his text. It’s brutal and painfully accurate in every description, argument and metaphor, and the unbreakable romantic connection depicted between the drinkers and their drink is heartbreaking. It’s hard to believe this is Lee’s first play with text as expertly crafted as this.

Director Iain Sinclair has given Lee’s partially autobiographical play a world on the verge of collapse – which drought will break first? There is an undercurrent of resolved certainty here in Broome – things here may always be as they are now. Sinclair smartly mines Lee’s metaphorical text for every piece of clarity and objectivity that the audience crave to tighten our understanding of events, and also ensures we can connect with every character’s intrinsic longing for change.

There are no weak links in this very strong cast, each member provides terrifyingly realistic portrayals of unassailable alcoholics and their affected familiars – there are years of damage and desperation behind these weary eyes. Mark Wilson is one of my favourite actors in Australia and once again he delivers a powerful performance as determined Will. Margaret Harvey must keep all the plates spinning as Claudia, attacking her role with exhausted grit – we can see Claudia’s fatigue for her day-to-day struggle at every turn.

Mark Coles Smith is startlingly energetic, combining his clear talent for physical performance with his emotionally driven and manipulative dialogue he terrifies us as the alcoholic but clever Jason. Jack Charles as Pat embraces his powerful gravitas with every step before he even opens his mouth. Charles’ jaded but accepting delivery of grief-stricken Pat locks our eyes deeply into his.

Jim Daly, Julie Forsyth and Alex Menglet play six characters between them so well that you’d be forgiven for thinking there were six separate actors on the stage. From frenzied addicts to bewildered tourists, each distinct character is detailed and often battles their own demons. There are other stories hiding within them waiting to be told.

Atmospheric light and sound design by Andy Turner and Russell Goldsmith respectively builds tension and extends the production design elements by Romanie Harper into the invisible distance. As the piece builds to a sudden climax, the remaining rubble of these crumbled minds reminds us of the inescapable and circular nature of addiction.

Bottomless explores consequences and guilt inside the mental pressure cooker that unhealthy dependence creates, and it’s a truly engrossing world to watch deteriorate. Addiction and sobriety are fascinating topics that create utterly engrossing characters, and I would happily have sat through a second hour of Bottomless. Congratulations to the whole team and especially to artistic director Mary Lou Jelbart for backing this new Australian piece over a number of years to finally reach this fully-fledged production.

 

Bottomless is being performed at fortyfivedownstairs until 14 December. Tickets can be purchased online and by calling the box office on 03 9662 9966. 

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